$69.99

TOOLIOM 135A 110V/220V Stick Welder MMA ARC Welder Machine DC Inverter Welder with Digital Display Portable Welding Machine

5 out of 5
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  • Reviews (3)

Description

Make sure this fits by entering your model number.; Can handle E6010 cellulose electrode, adopting IGBT Inverter power system,suitable for mild steel, cast iron, stainless steel as well as hard surfacing.; Equipped with digital display and trouble indicate,read the output welding current.;…

3 reviews for "TOOLIOM 135A 110V/220V Stick Welder MMA ARC Welder Machine DC Inverter Welder with Digital Display Portable Welding Machine"

  1. :

    So I just bought this welder for the hell of it. This is what you need to know:Regardless of whether you run it on 120V or 240V:A) it will not run TRUE E6010 electrodes!B) there is little to no hot-start which makes arc initiation difficult, especially if you’re used to peck-and-lift. A FIRM dragging for about ½ to 1″ long and then going back to the beginning of the joint will work much better to get the tip of the rod hot and ready to sustain the arc. So about 1 second is what it takes for the arc to fully develop and start burning effectively/efficiently.The 120V Story:As measured with an ammeter, it will output a maximum of ~95A of welding current, even if the digital display reads 100+. It pulls about 25A from a 120V outlet, since it did trip a dedicated 120V/20A outlet within about 2min, give or take. So with an output of 95A, that’s high enough to run 1/8″ 6011 if you want a forceful, deep-digging arc. It does an ok job. You can even do a slight whip-and-pause stitching motion and the arc won’t be too fussy. You can also run 3/32″ 6013s or 7018s decently. The arc voltage while welding is just a bit low, but that is to be expected on 120V. Thats the reason the arc/performance is “decent”. +15% higher arc voltage would have made it MUCH better. The arc-initiation is worse on 120V than on 240V input power.The 240V Story:As measured with an ammeter, it puts out a maximum of ~112A of welding current, even if the digital readout says more than that. The arc welding voltage is higher, which is good because the higher the voltage, the greater the arc-pressure against the weld puddle, which helps push slag back, and helps wet out the toes for good fusion at the edges of the bead. It can just barely run a 5/32″ 6011, but it’s much better sticking (no pun intended) with a 1/8″ 6011. It is also just barely enough to run 1/8″ 7018, which is key (IMO), since in the USA it’s likely the most “liked” of the standard SMAW rods. With those two rods (1/8″ 6011 and 1/8″ 7018), one can still get some decent welding done. Arc starting is a little better, but doing the peck-and-lift still proves futile. A firm dragging, long-match-strike is best to get the arc initiated. It’s especially critical with 7018 because it forms slag on the tip if you just barely melt the flux but not initiate the arc. Gotta get the arc initiated on the first try. Can’t long arc it either because the arc will snuff out. Gotta strike it, but have to keep the tip of the rod close, but not too close. A delicate balancing act.Now about 6010s.There are REAL 6010s: Lincoln 5P+, 6P+, etc, Böhler Fox, Blue Demon/Best Welds, just to name a few. It takes a machine with real balls (arc voltage) to run these. This Tooliom 135 is not that machine. The only REAL 6010 you can force it to run is a Lincoln 5P+ and only on 240V input power. But you have to bury tip very close into the puddle to keep the arc lit. If you lift up even 0.25mm, the arc snuffs out. Forget whip-and-pause. All in all, the result of trying to make it run 6010 5P+ is horrendous.Then there are “Ebay” 6010s. I bought some. Some come in red flux in 1/8″ and 5/32″, and the 3/32″ comes in a whitish/taupe flux. IMO, these are really a cross/combination of 6010s and 6011s, labeled as 6010s, or simply some altered alloy/flux designed to make them easier to run, just like 6011s. The arc is not as forceful as REAL 6010s. So this machine can sort-of run these “Ebay 6010s”, but essentially all it is doing is running 6011s, so it “looks” impressive, because real 6010s are “pipeline” rods. They let people who buy these cheap inverters say, “Hey, look my tiny little welder runs 6010s just like your Lincoln engine driven welder”, when in reality they don’t run real 6010s. But all is not lost. Just run 6011s as you’d be way better off and can have much better arc control and manipulation, and you get that arc characteristic if that is what you’re looking for. No need to lie to yourself (or others). :)So yea, this thing weighs 4.5 lbs, you can carry the whole thing with power cord and leads wrapped around it, with one hand. ¼ ” steel would be the single-pass limit with some 1/8″ 6011s at maximum output on 240V, if you know what you’re doing. “Cap it” with 1/8″ 7018 beads, and you’ll finish welding up that pipeline in no time! Check out the pics. That is ¼” steel plate with 1/8″ EBay-6010s and Messer 1/8″ 7018s.

  2. :

    So I just bought this welder for the hell of it. This is what you need to know:Regardless of whether you run it on 120V or 240V:A) it will not run TRUE E6010 electrodes!B) there is little to no hot-start which makes arc initiation difficult, especially if you’re used to peck-and-lift. A FIRM dragging for about ½ to 1″ long and then going back to the beginning of the joint will work much better to get the tip of the rod hot and ready to sustain the arc. So about 1 second is what it takes for the arc to fully develop and start burning effectively/efficiently.The 120V Story:As measured with an ammeter, it will output a maximum of ~95A of welding current, even if the digital display reads 100+. It pulls about 25A from a 120V outlet, since it did trip a dedicated 120V/20A outlet within about 2min, give or take. So with an output of 95A, that’s high enough to run 1/8″ 6011 if you want a forceful, deep-digging arc. It does an ok job. You can even do a slight whip-and-pause stitching motion and the arc won’t be too fussy. You can also run 3/32″ 6013s or 7018s decently. The arc voltage while welding is just a bit low, but that is to be expected on 120V. Thats the reason the arc/performance is “decent”. +15% higher arc voltage would have made it MUCH better. The arc-initiation is worse on 120V than on 240V input power.The 240V Story:As measured with an ammeter, it puts out a maximum of ~112A of welding current, even if the digital readout says more than that. The arc welding voltage is higher, which is good because the higher the voltage, the greater the arc-pressure against the weld puddle, which helps push slag back, and helps wet out the toes for good fusion at the edges of the bead. It can just barely run a 5/32″ 6011, but it’s much better sticking (no pun intended) with a 1/8″ 6011. It is also just barely enough to run 1/8″ 7018, which is key (IMO), since in the USA it’s likely the most “liked” of the standard SMAW rods. With those two rods (1/8″ 6011 and 1/8″ 7018), one can still get some decent welding done. Arc starting is a little better, but doing the peck-and-lift still proves futile. A firm dragging, long-match-strike is best to get the arc initiated. It’s especially critical with 7018 because it forms slag on the tip if you just barely melt the flux but not initiate the arc. Gotta get the arc initiated on the first try. Can’t long arc it either because the arc will snuff out. Gotta strike it, but have to keep the tip of the rod close, but not too close. A delicate balancing act.Now about 6010s.There are REAL 6010s: Lincoln 5P+, 6P+, etc, Böhler Fox, Blue Demon/Best Welds, just to name a few. It takes a machine with real balls (arc voltage) to run these. This Tooliom 135 is not that machine. The only REAL 6010 you can force it to run is a Lincoln 5P+ and only on 240V input power. But you have to bury tip very close into the puddle to keep the arc lit. If you lift up even 0.25mm, the arc snuffs out. Forget whip-and-pause. All in all, the result of trying to make it run 6010 5P+ is horrendous.Then there are “Ebay” 6010s. I bought some. Some come in red flux in 1/8″ and 5/32″, and the 3/32″ comes in a whitish/taupe flux. IMO, these are really a cross/combination of 6010s and 6011s, labeled as 6010s, or simply some altered alloy/flux designed to make them easier to run, just like 6011s. The arc is not as forceful as REAL 6010s. So this machine can sort-of run these “Ebay 6010s”, but essentially all it is doing is running 6011s, so it “looks” impressive, because real 6010s are “pipeline” rods. They let people who buy these cheap inverters say, “Hey, look my tiny little welder runs 6010s just like your Lincoln engine driven welder”, when in reality they don’t run real 6010s. But all is not lost. Just run 6011s as you’d be way better off and can have much better arc control and manipulation, and you get that arc characteristic if that is what you’re looking for. No need to lie to yourself (or others). :)So yea, this thing weighs 4.5 lbs, you can carry the whole thing with power cord and leads wrapped around it, with one hand. ¼ ” steel would be the single-pass limit with some 1/8″ 6011s at maximum output on 240V, if you know what you’re doing. “Cap it” with 1/8″ 7018 beads, and you’ll finish welding up that pipeline in no time! Check out the pics. That is ¼” steel plate with 1/8″ EBay-6010s and Messer 1/8″ 7018s.

  3. :

    Would not hold a Arc with 6010 welding rod

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