$64.98

Solar Lights Outdoor Remote Dual 42 LEDs Lights with 7.5″ X 11.4″ Light Sensor Solar Panels of 15ft Separated Cables IP65 Waterproof Lamps for Shed,Barn,Sign,Billboard,Pool,Flag Pole

4 out of 5
SKU:B07JC8KZG5 Category:
  • Description
  • Reviews (3)

Description

Make sure this fits by entering your model number.; Metal; Imported; ☼Outdoor Remote Control Solar Lights Automatic On/off ☀:Richarm Solar light will turn on at dusk and turn off automatic few hours Once you program Auto Mode. Die cast aluminium and bright led output at 60 degree to cover…

3 reviews for "Solar Lights Outdoor Remote Dual 42 LEDs Lights with 7.5″ X 11.4″ Light Sensor Solar Panels of 15ft Separated Cables IP65 Waterproof Lamps for Shed,Barn,Sign,Billboard,Pool,Flag Pole"

  1. :

    Item has two LED light units and one solar charging panel. The panel has two attached, fixed cords that plug into the two light units. There are no controls on either the lights or the charging panel. A remote control manages the functions of the light units. You do not have to have both light units plugged into the charging panel; i.e. if you only want to charge one light, you can. The LED units contain a battery that is charged by the panel. As the LED units are charging, a small orange light flashes on each unit. As long as the panel is receiving light from some source, the LED units will have a flashing light (when not turned on). There is no indication on the panel whether it is functional or not, charging or not, but this is fairly standard. The charging panel is well constructed with a glass face. The cords attaching the panel to the light units are about 16 feet long, so you could position the LED units about 32 feet apart, with the charging panel in the middle. Once charged, you can leave the panel attached, or detach the lights from the panel to use them somewhere else. The LED units are also well made; both the panel and lights are water-resistant, if not water-tight. Each light unit has 42 LEDs each, the small orange light, and an infrared receiver that accepts the commands from the remote control. If you lose the remote control, nothing works – almost. If you had set the LEDs to come on automatically when the environment goes dark, I believe that they will continue to function in that manner. The remote control has a number of functions: ON, OFF, 30%, 60%, 80%, intensity down, intensity up, 1H through 8H, and AUTO. The % buttons turn the LEDS on to that intensity. From ON or one of the % buttons, you can dim the LEDS down to a minimum that I would judge to be about 20%, or take it up to the maximum 100%. Once the LEDs are on, selecting one of the eight H buttons will turn the lights off after 1 hour, 2 hours, or up to 8 hours later. This depends however, on how fully charged the LED batteries are. If they were not fully charged and you selected the lights to turn off after 6 hours, the LEDS may turn off well before then when the juice runs out. For all the previous functions, you must use the remote control, every time. AUTO turns the lights on at dark, and off when the environment gets brighter. In this mode however, you CANNOT set the intensity – it comes on at full blast, and once on, you cannot dim it, or have it turn off after a set number of hours. For the most part, I do not believe that you will get near the 8 hours of use at full blast, it is probably more like 4 hours, but I have not tested this out. I did test the lights at 30% from a near full charge and got 7 hours out of them. I will do more tests later. The systems is advertised as “dusk to dawn” I’m not sure that this will quite make it unless you manually turn it on and turn the intensity to minimum, but it should be close! When you send a command from the remote, all 42 LEDS flash to signal that the command was received. When the lights are on, the orange charging light is off. I do not know if the unit is still being charged or not when the LEDs are in use; they may be, but I have no way of determining this without a lot of timing tests. Normally, you turn both units on/off/whatever such that both units are at 30% or on AUTO or whatever. However, if you can shield the two light units such that the remote signal is only picked up by one light unit at a time, you could set one ON, and the other at 30%, or in general, have them operating independently. Overall, this seems to be a good system. I’ve had several other solar light systems for flag poles or simple one or two LED utility lights (like this system). This has the best construction and functionality for the price range. I have not put it into use yet (it will be going in a 16×8 foot greenhouse for late evening (not all night) lighting in order to put tools away without stumbling), but it will certainly be plenty bright for its intended use. I would wish that you could have the AUTO function come on at a lower intensity so it might last longer into the evening, but this will not affect the way that I plan on using it. If your plans are similar, I’d highly recommend this system.

  2. :

    Item has two LED light units and one solar charging panel. The panel has two attached, fixed cords that plug into the two light units. There are no controls on either the lights or the charging panel. A remote control manages the functions of the light units. You do not have to have both light units plugged into the charging panel; i.e. if you only want to charge one light, you can. The LED units contain a battery that is charged by the panel. As the LED units are charging, a small orange light flashes on each unit. As long as the panel is receiving light from some source, the LED units will have a flashing light (when not turned on). There is no indication on the panel whether it is functional or not, charging or not, but this is fairly standard. The charging panel is well constructed with a glass face. The cords attaching the panel to the light units are about 16 feet long, so you could position the LED units about 32 feet apart, with the charging panel in the middle. Once charged, you can leave the panel attached, or detach the lights from the panel to use them somewhere else. The LED units are also well made; both the panel and lights are water-resistant, if not water-tight. Each light unit has 42 LEDs each, the small orange light, and an infrared receiver that accepts the commands from the remote control. If you lose the remote control, nothing works – almost. If you had set the LEDs to come on automatically when the environment goes dark, I believe that they will continue to function in that manner. The remote control has a number of functions: ON, OFF, 30%, 60%, 80%, intensity down, intensity up, 1H through 8H, and AUTO. The % buttons turn the LEDS on to that intensity. From ON or one of the % buttons, you can dim the LEDS down to a minimum that I would judge to be about 20%, or take it up to the maximum 100%. Once the LEDs are on, selecting one of the eight H buttons will turn the lights off after 1 hour, 2 hours, or up to 8 hours later. This depends however, on how fully charged the LED batteries are. If they were not fully charged and you selected the lights to turn off after 6 hours, the LEDS may turn off well before then when the juice runs out. For all the previous functions, you must use the remote control, every time. AUTO turns the lights on at dark, and off when the environment gets brighter. In this mode however, you CANNOT set the intensity – it comes on at full blast, and once on, you cannot dim it, or have it turn off after a set number of hours. For the most part, I do not believe that you will get near the 8 hours of use at full blast, it is probably more like 4 hours, but I have not tested this out. I did test the lights at 30% from a near full charge and got 7 hours out of them. I will do more tests later. The systems is advertised as “dusk to dawn” I’m not sure that this will quite make it unless you manually turn it on and turn the intensity to minimum, but it should be close! When you send a command from the remote, all 42 LEDS flash to signal that the command was received. When the lights are on, the orange charging light is off. I do not know if the unit is still being charged or not when the LEDs are in use; they may be, but I have no way of determining this without a lot of timing tests. Normally, you turn both units on/off/whatever such that both units are at 30% or on AUTO or whatever. However, if you can shield the two light units such that the remote signal is only picked up by one light unit at a time, you could set one ON, and the other at 30%, or in general, have them operating independently. Overall, this seems to be a good system. I’ve had several other solar light systems for flag poles or simple one or two LED utility lights (like this system). This has the best construction and functionality for the price range. I have not put it into use yet (it will be going in a 16×8 foot greenhouse for late evening (not all night) lighting in order to put tools away without stumbling), but it will certainly be plenty bright for its intended use. I would wish that you could have the AUTO function come on at a lower intensity so it might last longer into the evening, but this will not affect the way that I plan on using it. If your plans are similar, I’d highly recommend this system.

  3. :

    I absolutely love these lights. I got these for my 16×20 barn that’s pretty far from my house, perfect! So easy to install. Dont have to worry about a storing a separate battery. They are nice and brite. Sometimes the remote is funny and dosent want to work right off, I think it’s because it’s cold, they ALWAYS turn on amd off!I will definitely buy again!

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