County Line Kitchen Durable Cold Brew Mason Jar Coffee Maker with Handle. Glass Jar, Stainless Steel Filter, Flip Cap Lid – 2 Quart, 64 oz

5 out of 5
SKU:B07VJJJ764 Category:
  • Description
  • Reviews (3)

Description

Make sure this fits by entering your model number.; Easy to Use: Simply add coffee, steep overnight, and enjoy fresh cold brew in the morning. Simple cleanup with dishwasher safe components.; Stainless Steel Filter: Constructed of high-quality mesh that prevents coffee grounds from entering the…

3 reviews for "County Line Kitchen Durable Cold Brew Mason Jar Coffee Maker with Handle. Glass Jar, Stainless Steel Filter, Flip Cap Lid – 2 Quart, 64 oz"

  1. :

    Although I’m new to cold brewing I did do quite a bit of research before buying this cold brew system. And I’d highly recommend it to anyone. A couple quick tips for those getting started for the first time.1. First, for those of you on a municipal water system your water is probably chlorinated. Mine is, so before I start to make a batch I fill a big bowl with cold water and let it sit on the counter while I’m grinding the coffee beans. This lets the chlorine evaporate off, not that it would probably hurt anything but I’d rather not have it in my coffee. Those of you on a private well don’t have to worry about it.2. Next, grind your coffee beans to a medium grind. Pre-ground coffee would probably work but a lot of it would get through the strainer. Some will anyway regardless, but I just pour off the last slowly and discard any grounds that settle to the bottom.3. Next, put the strainer and gasket in the jar and fill the strainer about half to 2/3 full of grounds. They’ll expand as they get wet so any more than that will sit above the water level and get wasted. Pour the water slowly through the grounds in the strainer when filling the container to the fill line.4. Don’t put the cover on too tight, especially if you’re going to be putting in the fridge. The rubber gaskets get hard when they get cold so if you really tighten them you’ll have a pretty hard time getting the cover off to take the grounds out before use.5. There are a few factors in how strong the final brew is. First is the coffee beans you use, I use a medium or breakfast blend. Next is the brewing time, I usually go 15-20 hours. Finally, you can affect the brew by where you let it sit. You’ll get stronger coffee if you let it sit at room temperature as opposed to in the fridge. I do a mix of both depending on when I start. If I make a batch in the morning I’ll let it sit on the counter for several hours and then put it in the fridge overnight. If I make a batch in the afternoon I just let it sit on the counter overnight.Finally, take the cover off and remove the strainer and grounds. I drink the coffee straight up as I use a medium blend, if it’s too strong you can always dilute it as you wish. After drinking cold brew for a while, it’s amazing how harsh hot-brewed coffee tastes now. I’ll never go back.

  2. :

    Although I’m new to cold brewing I did do quite a bit of research before buying this cold brew system. And I’d highly recommend it to anyone. A couple quick tips for those getting started for the first time.1. First, for those of you on a municipal water system your water is probably chlorinated. Mine is, so before I start to make a batch I fill a big bowl with cold water and let it sit on the counter while I’m grinding the coffee beans. This lets the chlorine evaporate off, not that it would probably hurt anything but I’d rather not have it in my coffee. Those of you on a private well don’t have to worry about it.2. Next, grind your coffee beans to a medium grind. Pre-ground coffee would probably work but a lot of it would get through the strainer. Some will anyway regardless, but I just pour off the last slowly and discard any grounds that settle to the bottom.3. Next, put the strainer and gasket in the jar and fill the strainer about half to 2/3 full of grounds. They’ll expand as they get wet so any more than that will sit above the water level and get wasted. Pour the water slowly through the grounds in the strainer when filling the container to the fill line.4. Don’t put the cover on too tight, especially if you’re going to be putting in the fridge. The rubber gaskets get hard when they get cold so if you really tighten them you’ll have a pretty hard time getting the cover off to take the grounds out before use.5. There are a few factors in how strong the final brew is. First is the coffee beans you use, I use a medium or breakfast blend. Next is the brewing time, I usually go 15-20 hours. Finally, you can affect the brew by where you let it sit. You’ll get stronger coffee if you let it sit at room temperature as opposed to in the fridge. I do a mix of both depending on when I start. If I make a batch in the morning I’ll let it sit on the counter for several hours and then put it in the fridge overnight. If I make a batch in the afternoon I just let it sit on the counter overnight.Finally, take the cover off and remove the strainer and grounds. I drink the coffee straight up as I use a medium blend, if it’s too strong you can always dilute it as you wish. After drinking cold brew for a while, it’s amazing how harsh hot-brewed coffee tastes now. I’ll never go back.

  3. :

    I love cold brew coffee and have used the Toddy Maker system for over 10 years. But the cleanup and waste of coffee finally drove me to seek something else out. After reading about many other different systems, the simplicity and cost of this one made me decide to try it. I’m glad I did. While it took me a few tries to make it in the strength I wanted as well as the least messy way, I’ve consistently made at least one to two batches a week. It’s so easy, I find I’m drinking a lot more than normal (which may not be the most healthy thing in the world for me). For me, the trick for preparing a batch with as least a mess as possible was to fill up the cone with a GOOD solid inch left from the top. I then used the kitchen faucet on low, with the jar and filter below it, slowly stirring in the water with a butter knife into the coffee grounds (I just use Cafe Du Monde). I sometimes have to stop the water and stir more to let the water pass through the filter–especially as the mason jar becomes full. Then I just screw the solid, plastic cap on, click down the stopper, and shake the heck out of the jar, and leave for a good 24 hours (not the typical 12 I used to with the Toddy Maker). After the day, it’s a matter of just lifting out the filter–I typically place into a tall drinking glass to let the soaked coffee grounds drain (I don’t want to waste any of the concentrate!), pouring it into the main jar as the glass fills. I will typically pour the concentrate from the mason jar into another container (but you don’t have to; it works well as a pitcher). I do this so I can start preparing a new batch before I’m finished with the current batch. This means being honest with myself about how much I plan on drinking, so that I start preparing a new batch without being out… Cleanup is easy. Once the filter has finally drained most (I leave it out for a few hours), I just upend and tap the grounds into my trash. I then rinse out thoroughly, cleaning the lid and jar at the same time–I sometimes will also leave the filter in the jar aft wards, soaking overnight in soapy water just to make sure to remove any of the coffee buildup on the filter. Even though this seems too simple and cheap to be really worth it (a jar, a lid with a stopper-spout, and a metal filter), it really does work well. Best of all I can make about two and a half batches with one single can of Cafe Du Monde coffee grounds. I batch will last me almost a week (I drink way too much but it’s so good)–I use about 1/4-1/3 cup of the coffee concentrate and mix it into about 1 and 3/4 cups water. That, with a healthy dose of milk or creamer, makes for very large cup of coffee. If I want hot coffee, I just use hot water and add it to the cold concentrate. I’m so happy I decided to take the plunge–I haven’t looked back since!.

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